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Fun Ag Facts XII

Fun ag fact of the day: Georgia is the top-producing state, breaking the record for highest average yield with 4,555 pounds of peanuts per acre in 2012.

Fun ag fact of the day: Peanuts are grown in 15 states, with 55 percent being produced in the Southeastern states. The United States produced 6.7 billion pounds of peanuts in 2012 and ranks third in the world for peanut production behind China and India.

Fun ag fact of the day: The average American will consume more than six pounds of peanut products per year in the form of peanut butter, candy, roasted, salted, boiled and more. Despite not technically qualifying as a nut, peanuts are the most popular snack nut in the U.S., accounting for 67 percent of “nut” consumption.

Fun ag fact of the day: With edible kernels encased in a shell, the peanut is classified as a legume, along with beans and peas.

fun ag fact of the day: Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania and California are the top pumpkin producing states. In 2008, these states alone produced 1.1 billion pounds, or $141 million.

Fun ag fact of the day: Pumpkins are a source of potassium and vitamin A.

Fun ag fact of the day: Pumpkins are 90 percent water and part of the Cucurbitaceae family. They are related to squash and gourds.

Fun ag fact of the day:The largest pumpkin pie ever baked weighed over 350 pounds. This record breaking pastry required 80 pounds of pumpkin, 36 pounds of sugar, 12 dozen eggs and baked for six hours.

Fun ag fact of the day: most pumpkins are grown to be processed, while a small percentage are grown for decoration and sold at you-pick farms or farmer’s markets.

Fun ag fact of the day: The four varieties of peppermint are Black Mitcham, the original selection from the wild, and three variations: Todd’s Mitcham, Murray Mitcham and Robert’s Mitcham.

Fun ag fact of the day: Mint is shallow-rooted and requires loose-textured soils for good root penetration and growth. It requires 60 inches of rainfall for optimum growth and fertility.

Fun ag fact of the day: In 2010, the U.S. harvested 71,300 acres of peppermint.

Fun ag fact of the day: Native spearmint is used to flavor toothpaste and dental hygiene products, whereas Scotch spearmint has a milder, more pleasant taste and is used in chewing gum and candies.

Fun ag fact of the day: In 2010, the U.S. harvested 18,600 acres of spearmint.

Fun ag fact of the day: The Romans believed eating mint would increase intelligence. The scent of mint was also thought to stop a person from losing his or her temper, and royal ambassadors carried mint sprigs in their pockets.

Fun ag fact of the day: One ounce of pecans has as much protein as two servings of meat or beans.

Fun ag fact of the day: Pecans contain more than 19 various vitamins and minerals.

Fun ag fact of the day: According to the USDA Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center, pecans contain the most antioxidant capacity of any other nut.

Fun ag fact of the day: Pecans are naturally sodium free and a healthy snack alternative to chips.

Fun ag fact of the day: Pecans are grown on trees and often harvested by machine.

Fun ag fact of the day: The United States produces 80 percent of the world’s pecans.

Fun ag fact of the day: Georgia, the leading pecan-producing state since the 1800s, produced 100 million pounds in 2012.

Fun ag fact of the day: Peaches are grown commercially in 28 states. The top four peach-producing states are California, South Carolina, Georgia and New Jersey. California produces both fresh and processed peaches, whereas South Carolina and Georgia produce mainly fresh peaches.

Fun ag fact of the day: The two basic types of peaches are clingstone and freestone. In clingstone peaches, the flesh “clings” to the “stone” of the peach, making it difficult to separate. This type is more suitable for processing. The pit of freestone peaches “freely” separates from the flesh, making it ideal for fresh consumption.

Fun ag fact of the day: According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, in 2010, roughly 80 percent of processed peaches were canned and 16 percent were frozen.

Fun ag fact of the day: The peach is a member of the rose family, and there are over 700 varieties of the fruit.

fun ag fact of the day: One-half cup of basil provides 97.7 percent of your daily vitamin K, and has only 5 calories.

fun ag fact of the day: originally found in India, Asia and Africa, basil was introduced to Europe through international trade.

fun ag fact of the day: Basil is a warm weather annual that requires six to eight hours of sun.

fun ag fact of the day: Harvest frequently by pinching leaves from the stems to encourage continued growth.

fun ag fact of the day: As the weather warms, basil will bloom, causing the plant to stop growing. To prevent this, pinch off bloom stems.

fun ag fact of the day: Basil is best added to dishes within the last five to ten minutes of cooking.

fun ag fact of the day: Basil can be used dried or fresh in a variety of soups, salads, sauces and dishes.

 

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Fun Ag Facts X

fun ag fact of the day:  Turkey is the largest producer of apricots in the world.

fun ag fact of the day: Bananas are the most produced fruit in the world, roughly 33lbs each year for everyone on earth.

Fun ag fact of the day: Nearly one out of five (19%) of Americans prefer apple pie, followed by pumpkin (13%), pecan (12%), banana cream (10%) and cherry (9%).

fun ag fact of the day: It takes 768 bees flying over 55,000 miles visiting 2 million flowers to produce 1lb of honey.

fun ag fact of the day: There are over 3,000 pear varieties grown throughout the world. These varieties include Green Anjou, Red Anjou, Bartlett, Bosc, Comice, Concorde, Forelle, Seckle and Starkrimson. Each variety has its own unique flavor, smell and texture.

fun ag fact of the day: Washington is the top pear producing stated, followed by California, Oregon, New York and Pennsylvania.

fun ag fact of the day: The crabapple is the only apple native to North America.

fun ag fact of the day: Moro oranges are also called blood oranges.

fun ag fact of the day: Plums belong to the Prunus genus of plants and are relatives of the peach, nectarine and almond. They are all considered “drupes,” fruits that have a hard stone pit surrounding their seeds. When plums are dried, they are known as prunes.

fun ag fact of the day: Twenty-nine cuts of beef meet government guidelines for lean.

fun ag fact of the day: Beef is a nutrient-dense food and is the #1 source of protein, vitamin B12 and zinc.

fun ag fact of the day: Two peanut farmers have been elected president of the USA – Thomas Jefferson and Jimmy Carter.

fun ag fact of the day:  The United States and Canada are ranked 1st & 2nd and account for roughly 85% of the world’s production of blueberries, followed by France in 3rd.

fun ag fact of the day: There is an estimated 1,500 different types of tea.

fun ag fact of the day: There are two basic methods employed in processing corn kernels. They are known as “dry milling” and “wet milling.”
Dry milling is the process in which corn is separated into flour, corn meal, grits and other products by soaking corn kernels in water, then removing the germ for processing into oil. The remaining parts of the kernel are ground and sieved into various fractions.
Wet milling is the process by which corn is separated into starch (syrup, ethanol, corn starch), germ (oil), and fiber and gluten (animal feed) by soaking corn kernels in water (and often sulfur dioxide) before separating them into the components above by grinding and centrifuge.

fun ag fact of the day: Super Bowl Sunday is the second-largest day for consumption of food and drink for Americans, behind Thanksgiving Day.

fun ag fact of the day: Oenophobia is an intense fear or hatred of wine.

fun ag fact of the day: The smell of young wine is called an “aroma” while a more mature wine offers a more subtle “bouquet.”

fun ag fact of the day: Asparagus can be green, white or purple.

fun ag fact of the day: In 1900, the death rate in the US from gastritis, duodentitis, enteritis, and colitis was 142.7 people per 100,000. Today, just 1.4 deaths per 100,000 people

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Fun Ag Facts XIII

fun ag fact of the day: Pumpkins are usually orange but can sometimes be yellow, white, green or red.

fun ag fact of the day: Pomegranates will make a metallic sound when tapped when ripe

fun ag fact of the day: tart cherries contain 19 times the of beta carotene of blueberries and strawberries.

Fun ag fact of the day: The United States is the largest importer of pumpkins in the world.

Fun ag fact of the day: Italy is the world’s largest producer of artichokes, kiwi fruit, peeled tomatoes, vermouth, and wine!

fun ag fact of the day: There are over 700 varieties of peaches!

fun ag fact of the day: China is the largest producer of peaches in the world; they consider the peach as a symbol of longevity and good luck.

fun ag fact of the day: Both the Texas State Fair and Minnesota claim to have invented the first corn dog, sometime around 1940.

fun ag fact of the day: It’s nation filet mignon day! Filet Mignon comes from the tenderloin or psoas major muscle, which lays along both sides of the beef animal’s spine. It means “Dainty Filet” in French. This cut is the most tender muscle in the beef animal and it’s delicious!!

fun ag fact of the day: there is only one gene that separates peaches and nectarines – the one with the fuzz.

fun ag fact of the day: California is the nation’s number one Ice Cream producer, churning out over 131 million gallons last year.

fun ag fact of the day: 1 gallon of milk equals approximately 345 udder squirts!

fun ag fact of the day: There are more than 1,200 varieties of watermelon. CA and AZ are top producers.

fun ag fact of the day: cotton is in the same family as hibiscus, okra, and swamp mallow.

fun ag fact of the day: 99% of the commercial U.S. supply and 3/4 of the world trade of walnuts now come from California.

fun ag fact of the day: Cucumbers are believed to have originated in India 3,000 years ago.

fun  ag fact of the day: Pistachios are one of the oldest flowering nut trees, and are one of the only two nuts mentioned in the Bible (Genesis 43:11). Humans have eaten pistachio nuts for at least 9,000 years.

fun ag fact of the day: A pig’s squeal can be as loud as 115 decibels, 3 decibels higher than the sound of a supersonic airliner.

fun ag fact of the day: Spain in the second largest producer in the world of almonds, citrus juice (conc), mule meat, strawberries, tangerines & vermouth.

fun ag fact of the day: Spain in the largest producer in the world of carobs, olives & olive oil.

fun ag fact of the day: The United States is the largest producer of soybeans in the world followed by Brazil & Argentina. The United States, Brazil & Argentina produce roughly 80% of the world’s soybeans.

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Adult 4-H: Piglets and Kidlets

Are you ready for some cute? Fair warning, some of these pictures are going to make your ovaries hurt. First off, a little backstory. Pigs love pumpkins, so do cows, and I’ve been told horses will eat them too. So in a quest to feed our piggies a pastured diet and cut down on waste I issued a call to my friends for their leftover pumpkins (since it was just Halloween).

My Dad went next store to the neighbor’s field and picked through their tilled pumpkin patch for the piggies!

Char got his own sized pumpkin.

The piggies ate their bucket of pumpkins pretty quickly.

The bucket of pumpkins had a few ears of corn in it. Those cobs were like gold! One pig would get one and try and run off and hide, while the others chased him down. I nearly peed my pants laughing so hard.

I had some awesome friends offer to bring me their pumpkins!

Miss Olivia was kind enough to donate her halloween pumpkins and she even helped feed it to the piggies!

The pigs really liked her after that.

After pumpkins it was time to root and play in the mud.

I was helping my future 4-H member Olive feed the pigs pecans.*

Olive and Char got along very well. Even old Nikki dog enjoyed the day and did her best to keep the pigs in a circle for the kids.

Olive was showing us how the pigs drink, I think she wanted one of these at her house.

Olive helped root too! I don’t think she liked it as much as the pigs.

Adult 4-H has been such a wonderful experience so far. In addition to having a lot of fun with the pigs and the other 4-H members, I’m having a ball watching other people meet the pigs. Hopefully I’m influencing a few future 4-H members (I kid, kinda). Stay tuned for more pig fun.

*Photo courtesy of Shannon McCollum

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