Tag Archives: pastured pork

Wordless Wednesday: Oink

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Kickstarter: The Books

Joy & Keith Book  and Katie & Brian Drake.

Joy & Keith Book and Katie & Brian Drake.

I am friends with a lot of local farms and ranches. I mean it can’t be helped, many of these people have known my family for generations. One of my favorite friends and neighbors are the Books. I have very fond memories of going to their pumpkin patch as a child and riding in their horse drawn wagon. Then in high school I attended the same school as the Book children and we became friends. After high school I re-connected with Katie and her husband Brian and their two adorable children.

Brian and Katie moved home to their family farm to continue the great work they have always done, farming and ranching. They contacted me to talk about our grassfed beef operation, and since then I have really enjoyed getting to know them again and watching the good they are doing. Katie taught me how to make Kombucha and we sold them a heifer bull. Brian came over and helped move bulls and gave me some riding pointers. I heart them, needless to say. They are a bright and shinny beacon of awesome local agriculture.

In addition to all this they are also wonderful educators. For as long as I can remember they literally had their barn door open to the public. They have shown thousands of locals what a working farm looks like. If you read this blog, you know how I feel about that (I LOVE it).

This looked like so much fun!!!! I was super butt hurt to miss it (especially because I love me some Mexican food).

This looked like so much fun!!!! I was super butt hurt to miss it (especially because I love me some Mexican food).

So I am totally stoked to share with my readers about their Kickstart! They need a new tractor and you can help! Please check it out, click here and you can see their awesome video! They had a really fun launch at a local Mexican restaurant (that I had to miss because I was working in the mountains with my Dad), but I Katie did send me some pictures.

If you have a few bucks to spare please consider investing in the Books. I promise you, your investment will pay dividends that our entire society will benefit from. Thanks friends!

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Adult 4-H: The Hog Slaughter Appointment

WARNING! This might be considered by some to be gross, inappropriate, or tragic, but I think it is extremely important share the how’s, what’s and why’s of our food. If you have any questions about anything you see please ask – I love to share about the ranch.

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As I shared with you before, our hogs have been slaughtered. That was the whole reason we bought the hogs, to eat them. They were not pets. We never planned on keeping them. They would not have existed at all if they did not perform this function. I chose this particular breed of hog because it is a critically endangered heritage hog. I wanted to use this blog to hopefully encourage other producers and ranchers to investigate the red wattle, tamworth, or hereford hog, to raise! And since I know that happened, I feel really happy about this whole project!

I now see people use the term slaughter and harvest interchangeably. While I attended Chico State, our professor, Dr. Dave Daley, urged us to use the word harvest. And at the time that made sense to me. For me when I think of the word harvest, I think of harvesting a crop, and that usually brings up a very pretty picture in my head, like a beautiful field of golden wheat. But when I asked Dr. Grandin about what word she uses, she said slaughter. I see that point too – slaughtering an animal is not often pretty, there is blood and smells. It’s not an idyllic act. By using the term “harvest” I feel like we are disrespecting both the animal whose life we are taking and our consumer by trying to gloss over something that more people should be able to see and participate in, the raising and slaughtering of our own food.

Now that the slaughter is over I’ve had some time to reflect on my time with the hogs. I deeply enjoyed them, that is true. Did I love them like a pet? No. I enjoyed having a job on the Ranch that was completely mine. I liked cooking food for them and watching as my rations changed how they grew, it was almost like one giant science experiment for me, with bacon as a reward.

We had the hogs slaughtered on the Ranch. It’s called custom exempt slaughter. Animals that are slaughtered this way are not for the public’s consumption. This meat will be strictly for my friends and families enjoyment. I prefer this method of slaughter because the animals never have to leave their home. In the hog’s case, one second they were asleep in the sun, and the next they were gone.

Jake bring the dead hog to the truck to be processed.

Jake bringing the dead hog to the truck to be processed.

Our Butcher, Dave, uses a small caliber rifle to shoot the hog directly in the head. One shot and the hog is immediately dead. Dave then swiftly slits the hog’s throat to bleed it out. One thing I think a lot of people do not realize (because we are very disconnected from death) is when a healthy living being is shot and killed the muscles still have energy. This makes the body thrash and move, again this is something that the movies, TV and video games never show. For people that have never seen death, this often comes as a shock, but again, this is what really happens.

Being placed on the rack.

Being placed on the rack.

After the hog is bled out, he is brought over to the truck and lifted on to a stand. These hogs weighed close to 300 pounds when they were slaughtered, so Dave has a hydraulic lift that enables him to lift these hogs quickly and easily. The hogs will be washed off to help removed the mud, dirt and blood from their coats.

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Getting washed off.

Getting washed off.

After they are cleaned off the feet are removed and the skinning process can begin. They start on the belly of the hog. They work their way down the sides and around the legs, being very careful not to let the outside of the side touch the carcass. By not allowing the outside of the skin to touch the carcass, they are mitigating potential cross-contamination (aka poo on the meat).

The start of the skinning.

The start of the skinning.

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Almost halfway.

Almost halfway.

The gamble.

Attaching the gamble.

Once the skin is about halfway off, he put the hog’s back legs in a gamble.

Cutting the sternum.

Cutting the sternum.

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Removing the skin from around the legs.

Removing the skin from around the legs.

Then he cuts the sternum with a saw to remove the internal organs. As he raises the hog with the lift, the organs almost remove themselves, Dave then is careful to clean out the cavity.

Dave giving us a lesson about organs.

Dave giving us a lesson about organs.

The liver.

The liver.

The heart and ventricles .

The heart and ventricles .

One of the many, many reasons I adore Dave is he is a wonderful teacher. We had all three adult 4-H members and two of their husbands out to watch this and Dave took the time to explain everything and give us some lesson. He pointed out what organ was what, and how they all connected in the hog.

Dave slaughtered the hogs two at a time. The hogs were not upset by what was going on, they continued to sleep as this was going on mere yards away from them.

Dave slaughtered the hogs two at a time. The hogs were not upset by what was going on, they continued to sleep as this was going on mere yards away from them.

Dave made an excellent point about the difference between animals and humans when it comes to death. If a human saw his friend get slaughtered and skinned like the hogs, the human would freak out, run, you know, have the flight or flight reaction. Whereas when the hogs watched their companions getting slaughtered they went and took a nap. Many people anthropomorphize animals, and it’s no wonder. Often people’s only interaction with farm animals as children are talking pigs, bunnies, mice and roosters, with human emotions and actions. In real life animals are not like that, they are animals not people.

I thought this was genius, what a great way to make the work easier and faster!

I thought this was genius, what a great way to make the work easier and faster!

After the organs are removed, Dave continues skinning the hog. He uses his lift to quickly and easily remove the reminder of the hide.

This is the barrel for waste, the organs that we don’t eat, skin and the feet. It will be take to the rendering plant and recycled

This is the barrel for waste, the organs that we don’t eat, skin and the feet. It will be taken to the rendering plant and recycled

The hogs done. They will now be taken back to the Locker where they will be cut, wrapped and cured.

The hogs done. They will now be taken back to the Locker where they will be cut, wrapped and cured.

Dividing the organs. I was surprised how big pig livers are.

Dividing the organs. I was surprised how big pig livers are.

I was very proud of my Adult 4-H members for taking the tongue, livers and hearts home to eat. We really tried to waste nothing on these hogs.

Raising these hogs and teaching other women about hogs and the Ranch was a very fulfilling project. I’m proud of it. I’m proud that I know many people learned from my blog. I’m touched how many people followed along and supported me when the drama hit. I’m excited to know at least one other person is now going to start raising Red Wattle hogs, so my plan for exposing this breed came to fruition. Most of all, I’m over the moon about finally getting to try this caliber of pork! Also a big THANK YOU Amy Sipes for posting a picture of a red wattle chop all those years ago, without that picture my parents would have never allowed me to start raising hogs again. I owe you lady!

Again a huge, big, old thank you to Chico Locker and Sausage for allowing us to learn! And being so amazing transparent and proud of what you do! We love you so much! You are such a gem in our community!

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Adult 4-H: Pig Update – So Close!

It’s been a while since I’ve done a pig update. It’s time. The pigs are over 200 pounds a piece now. They are growing like weeds! We have about a month left before “the appointment”.

Remember how little and cute they WERE? Notice the feeder? I put it in there so you could compare.

Remember how little and cute they WERE? Notice the feeder? I put it in there so you could compare.


They spend a lot of time eating, rooting and foraging. I sometimes let them out to find acorns and eat grass. They loved it!
Happy pigs!

Happy pigs!


Wattle hog (what I named the pig that has the wattles) found one of the dog’s bones and took off. He refused to go back into his pen and he refused to give me his bone. I think I know where the term “pig headed” came from.
This is where Wattle Hog found the bone. Notice Nikki looking a little more nervous than usual? That is her bone pile.

This is where Wattle Hog found the bone. Notice Nikki looking a little more nervous than usual? That is her bone pile.


Since I’ve been literally cooking their food, I can use kitchen waste, garden waste and that kinda stuff. I keep my eyes open for pumpkins, old bread, fruit, etc. As I was coming home from getting apples at my favorite apple farm, I spied a sign and two big pallets of FREE bread.
It was pretty awesome bread. I picked through the containers and picked out all the moldy bread to cook and use as pig food.

It was pretty awesome bread. I picked through the containers and picked out all the moldy bread to cook and use as pig food.


My little car will filled with bread. I was quite pleased with myself.

My little car will filled with bread. I was quite pleased with myself.


For some reason these pigs insist on using their bedroom as their bathroom. In all my experience with animals, I have never seen this. All my other pigs would either go outside their bedroom or have a corner of their room dedicated as the bathroom area. Even the horse have a particular corner of their pasture they do their business in. Their lack of hygiene means we have to clean their room often. And it is a nasty, bad, gross, job.
My Mom thought she was being funny taking a picture of me cleaning the pig pen in my PJ's. I have no shame - I work in an office all week where I have to wear dresses and make-up. It's my goal to look as socially unacceptable as I can during the weekend!

My Mom thought she was being funny taking a picture of me cleaning the pig pen in my PJ’s. I have no shame – I work in an office all week where I have to wear dresses and make-up. It’s my goal to look as socially unacceptable as I can during the weekend!


Granted, I did smell like a billy goat/hog after I cleaned their bedroom, but luckily, I have a secret weapon to combat pig stank.
This is the most effective soap at removing pig stank. Of course my Mom's soap is the best, but since you all don't have access to it like I do...

This is the most effective soap at removing pig stank. Of course my Mom’s soap is the best, but since you all don’t have access to it like I do…


Since we are about a month away from slaughtering these guys, I’ve been increasing the amount of almonds they are getting in their food. The extra protein has been making them gain like no one’s business, and hopefully, the nutty flavor with influence the flavor of the meat. I know in Spain they are famous for their nut finished pork. I’m so excited to see if this works!
Pig food, rolled barely, corn, bread, almonds, pumpkins, and kitchen waste all cooked together. The pigs love it.

Pig food, rolled barely, corn, bread, almonds, pumpkins, and kitchen waste all cooked together. The pigs love it.


Since it is February in Northern California and we have been having beautiful, sunny, upper 60′s days, the pigs have made themselves a mud hole.
Mud hole!!!! This is what I mean when I say "happy as pigs in shit"

Mud hole!!!! This is what I mean when I say “happy as pigs in shit”


After a nice mud bath they like to lay in the sun, they really like it when you brush them while they lay in the sun.
This is what happens when you brush them. They lay ON you, and fall asleep.

This is what happens when you brush them. They lay ON you, and fall asleep.


After mud bath sun soak.

After mud bath sun soak.

I figure we have about a month left with these guys. I’ve really enjoyed having pigs on the Ranch again. I’ve learned a lot over these past few months, and have really enjoyed my Dad’s involvement and guidance. I can’t wait to taste this pork! But I am going to admit right now, I am going to miss these guys! Especially Wattle Hog. We’ve become friends (I KNOW better), but I couldn’t help it. He’s such a character! Look forward to one more Pig Post and then another slaughter post (I wonder if the pork council is going to say something to me?).

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Adult 4-H: Piglets and Kidlets

Are you ready for some cute? Fair warning, some of these pictures are going to make your ovaries hurt. First off, a little backstory. Pigs love pumpkins, so do cows, and I’ve been told horses will eat them too. So in a quest to feed our piggies a pastured diet and cut down on waste I issued a call to my friends for their leftover pumpkins (since it was just Halloween).

My Dad went next store to the neighbor’s field and picked through their tilled pumpkin patch for the piggies!

Char got his own sized pumpkin.

The piggies ate their bucket of pumpkins pretty quickly.

The bucket of pumpkins had a few ears of corn in it. Those cobs were like gold! One pig would get one and try and run off and hide, while the others chased him down. I nearly peed my pants laughing so hard.

I had some awesome friends offer to bring me their pumpkins!

Miss Olivia was kind enough to donate her halloween pumpkins and she even helped feed it to the piggies!

The pigs really liked her after that.

After pumpkins it was time to root and play in the mud.

I was helping my future 4-H member Olive feed the pigs pecans.*

Olive and Char got along very well. Even old Nikki dog enjoyed the day and did her best to keep the pigs in a circle for the kids.

Olive was showing us how the pigs drink, I think she wanted one of these at her house.

Olive helped root too! I don’t think she liked it as much as the pigs.

Adult 4-H has been such a wonderful experience so far. In addition to having a lot of fun with the pigs and the other 4-H members, I’m having a ball watching other people meet the pigs. Hopefully I’m influencing a few future 4-H members (I kid, kinda). Stay tuned for more pig fun.

*Photo courtesy of Shannon McCollum

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