Tag Archives: gravy

Beef Tips in Gravy

As a cattle rancher, most people assume my favorite thing is steak and I eat them all the time. Not true. As well all know (or we should), a beef is not made out of pure steak. There are lots and lots of other cuts that make up a beef carcass. In my book, steak can be a whisper overrated. I thoroughly enjoy the lesser known cuts of beef. Plus my Parents get seriously pissed off when I eat all the steaks.

I could eat this almost every day. Especially if the roasted broccoli is involved.

I could eat this almost every day. Especially if the roasted broccoli is involved.

When my clients buy a beef from me, often they will get cuts of beef they’ve never seen before. Since buying meat from me is a full service program, I am here to offer suggestions, ideas and recipes to use their less familiar cuts. This is one of the recipes I like to share.

My Mom and I split this roast, I made Beef Tips, she made stew.

My Mom and I split this roast, I made Beef Tips, she made stew.

This is arguably my favorite meal. It is my ultimate death row food. I’ve started and ended relationships over this meal.  It’s easy, cheap and amazing. This is some powerful, powerful juju, not to be taken lightly. I’m imparting some great power to you here, use it for good.

You will  need...

You will need…

Beef Tips in Gravy

  • 2 pounds cubed beef  (stew meat, bottom round, arm roasts all work – basically you want to use a cut of meat that likes to be cooked low and slow) (venison also work well)
  • 1 can cream of mushroom soup
  • 1 can cream of celery soup
  • ½ cup red wine
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 package dry onion soup
  • Pepper
It looks hideous before you cook it, I know. But doesn't most delicious things?

It looks hideous before you cook it, I know. But doesn’t most delicious things?

Mix together all the ingredients and place in covered casserole dish for 3 hours at 300. This is also a great crockpot meal.

After the baking for 3 hours or crockpoting on high for 4 hours, its ready. Your house will smell savory and meaty and it will bring all the boys to your yard.

Serve this over noodles (my favorite because that is how my Mom does it), rice or mashed potatoes. Make sure you have some warm bread to mop up all the gravy. Then go take a nap.

Seriously, I will cut people for these leftovers.

Check on this recipe from Life on a Kanas Cattle Ranch for Beefy Noodles!

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Filed under Ag, agriculture, Beef, food, Humor, Know a California Farmer, meat, photos, Ranch life, Rants, Recipe, Uncategorized

Beef Swiss Steak

When I was  a little kid, my Mom would make swiss steak with a can of cream of mushroom soup. It was pretty much one of my favorite things to eat – beef, carrots, potatoes and gravy. Four out of my six food groups (bread and chocolate are the other two).

Since I accidentally obsessed over canning this summer, I decided to make swiss steak the traditional way, with tomatoes. I accidentally canned a crapton of tomatoes this summer and until I use some of my canned goods up, I can’t make anymore preserves (I’m out of jars).

I have so, so, so many canned goods. But these tomatoes are yummy, so it's ok.

I have so, so, so many canned goods. But these tomatoes are yummy, so it’s ok.

For Sunday Supper last night I made “traditional” swiss steak. It was cheap, easy and delicious so I am sharing it with my dear readers.

I used top sirloin because I was too lazy to dig in the freezer to find a bottom round (this is a great recipe to use a cut of beef that likes to be braised).

I used top sirloin because I was too lazy to dig in the freezer to find a bottom round (this is a great recipe to use a cut of beef that likes to be braised).

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs (or close to) beef top sirloin or bottom round
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • oil
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 3 gloves garlic, mashed
  • 4 cups canned tomatoes
  • 5 large carrots, chunked
  • 6  yukon gold potatoes, chunked
  • 1/2 lb green beans
  • worcestershire sauce
  • 1 cup broth
  • 2 bay leaves

Mix your flour and spices together. Dredge your meat in the flour and spice mixture.

Dredge your meat in the flour and spice mixture.

Dredge your meat in the flour and spice mixture.

In a dutch oven, brown your dredged meat in oil (I highly recommend bacon grease).  When your meat is browned, remove from heat, and add your onion. Cook your onion until caramelized, then add your mashed garlic for 30 seconds.

Browned beef. Yum.

Browned beef. Yum.

Add your beef back into your dutch oven, with the onion and garlic mixture. Add the broth, tomatoes, bay leaves and worcestershire sauce. Let that simmer over low heat for about an hour and half (also for the record you could make this in a crockpot, after you brown the meat, just add everything into your crockpot and cook for four hours).

After your meat has simmered add your potatoes and carrots, you could add celery too, but it’s not my favorite, so I omitted it in favor of green beans! Let your root veggies cook for about a half an hour, then add your green beans (I like my beans slightly crispy).

I love one dish meals. Less dishes, gravy - what isn't there to love?

I love one dish meals. Less dishes, gravy – what isn’t there to love?

After your beans are done to your liking, it’s go time. I use the “gravy” to cover the potatoes and dip bread in, it’s glorious. This is a great cold weather meal, it really sticks to your ribs!

It's not the prettiest of meals, but it is hearty, yummy and affordable. Yes.

It’s not the prettiest of meals, but it is hearty, yummy and affordable. Yes.

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Filed under Ag, agriculture, Beef, food, Know a California Farmer, meat, photos, Ranch life, Recipe, Uncategorized

Provençal Beef Brisket

It’s easy. It’s good. And there is gravy involved. It’s already a winner in my book.

French type food, with lots of flavor, fresh herbs, sauces, butter, – well you get it – are amongst my most favorite things. That is why I really like this recipe. And I get to use my beef. Plus there is some crock pot action, always good.

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Get a Knorr French Onion Soup mix, a can of Italian Style diced tomatoes (don’t drain) and a head of garlic. Cut the root end of the garlic off, so all the cloves come apart.

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Gather your herbs, I recommend fresh lavender, rosemary, oregano and dried bay leaves. But like you could probably use a tablespoon or so of herbes de provence and be just fine.

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Brown Ranch grass finished brisket.

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Put everything in your crock-pot with a cup of red wine and a half cup of water. You want the liquid to almost cover the beef. Crack some pepper in there too. A lot. Because it is good.

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Set your crock-pot to low and walk away for at least 8 hours. You want it to look like this.

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This is the bad boy all ready and “resting”.

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Ok, horrible picture, I know. Please ignore the big hunk of fat, ok?  My point here is to prove how this meat just falls apart. It’s a bitch to cut. I had a crap knife when I was doing it – but no one will care, just cover it in gravy.

Time to make gravy!!!! And trust me – you are going to want to make the gravy.

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Start by melting a tablespoon and half of butter in your pan (I like cast iron – but it was dirty when I was making this).

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Add like maybe a 1/4 cup flour (I didn’t really keep track). You are making a roux, Alton Brown does a really good show on roux, if you need some help making it.

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Add your meat drippings from the crock pot. If you added fresh herbs, take them out. I do a rough strain of the drippings – you know, get the big chunks out.

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Stir those drippings and the roux until it’s smooth. At this point it should start thickening up. Add potato water (from the mashed potatoes you are making to go with this dinner.), to the gravy until you get a consistency you like. I let it simmer while I slice the beef, prepare the salad, mash the potatoes – usually around 10 – 15 minutes. Add more potato water as need and check for salt and pepper too.

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I know this looks gross – but letmetellyouwhat, this is the icing on the proverbial meat cake. The garlic glove has mellowed, roasted and absorbed the beef fat, heaven on a baguette slice.  The clove slips out of its skin jacket and smears deliciously on bread. My boyfriend and I fight over this.

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Cross Rib Roast

  • 3-5 pound cross rib roast
  • Garlic
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • Olive oil
  • sea salt
  • pepper
  • 1-2 teaspoons fine dried herbs (Rosemary, paprika, parsley etc)

I make a mixture of herbs, pepper, salt and balsamic vinegar. Peel a head of garlic.

Using a sharp knife point from a paring or a boning knife make several slits in the top of the meat. Tuck slivers or whole pieces of garlic into each slit.

Coat with your spice/vinegar mixture, drizzle with a little olive oil.  Notice I cook my roast in my cast iron frying pan, that way when I make gravy later it’s easy!

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Calculate cooking time, using 20 minutes per pound of meat as a guide for a cross rib roast. Place roast in oven, TURN THE TEMPERATURE DOWN to 350 degrees and roast for the calculated time, checking with an instant meat thermometer after 3/4 of the cooking time just to make sure things are going ok. The thermometer should register about 140 (rare) to 155 degrees (medium). Remove from oven.

Look how pretty!

Pull your roast from the oven and tent with foil for about 20 minutes so the meat can rest and the juices can re-absorb.

Slice the meat and serve with mashed potatoes and gravy. This is seriously one of my death row foods, the leftovers are even still breathtaking!

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Filed under Ag, agriculture, Beef, food, Know a California Farmer, meat, photos, Ranch life, Recipe