Tag Archives: cattle

Beef For Sale

It’s that time of the year again! I’m finishing beef for you!

After much complaining and sulking on my part, my Parents have graciously given me our open heifers to sell as beef to you. These are the sisters of the animals we sell to commercial outlets, your Whole Foods, Costco and Raley’s. These heifers didn’t do their job, to get pregnant, so they now they get go to your freezer camp

Herd-mates of your beef checking out Boo dog

Herd-mates of your beef checking out Boo dog

I like to eat heifers because I think they are just a whisper sweeter. This is just personal opinion though. These full blooded black angus heifers are 24-30 months old and weigh around 1100-1200 pounds. I believe the best meat comes from beef animals this age, breed and gender. 

This has where they are living, better view than your house, huh?

This has where they are living, better view than your house, huh?

These beefs have enjoyed a grass diet, here on the ranches, their whole lives. Recently they have been enjoying their summer on clover and natural grasses in picturesque Indian Valley, California. They have received no antibiotics, added hormones, and our handling set up is based on Dr. Temple Grandin’s methods. 

This year, I am offering both grass finished and grain finished animals. I know the popularity for totally grass-fed beef is growing, especially for people involved with CrossFit. If you want a grain finished beef (this is what my family eats), I plan to use a corn, oats, and barley with molasses mix. I plan on starting the finishing process this week, so if you are interested best let me know sooner than later. The beef should be ready for pick up in September. 

A few of the heifers available for sale.

A few of the heifers available for sale.

Down to business.  I charge you for the actual live animal. You will be the proud owner of a live heifer for a while. When the beef is “finished”, I will make an appointment with a mobile slaughter truck and have the beef killed here on our ranch. I am a big fan of this because the beef will not experience any stress, one second she’s hanging out with her cow friends, doing cow things, the next she’s not. 

You will work with the Locker to order the cuts of beef you want. It’s my favorite part, a Foodies dream! You can choose your cuts, how many per package, ect. Please check out this link, it’s a great reference. The Locker will guide you through the cuts and make this experience educational. 

My beef usually goes for around $2000-$2400 for a whole beef. However, most people don’t have room for a whole beef in their freezer, so I offer ½ and ¼ beefs as well. (The general rule is about 28 pounds of meat per cubic foot of freezer space.)

If you choose a half or quarter, you will split the cost of the whole beef. The prices fluctuates based on how you want your beef finished (grass is slightly more) and how much you get. A whole is slightly cheaper than a quarter because it’s less work for me to sell in bulk. 

You will pay me and the Locker separately. The Locker charges an $125 kill/disposal fee per animal. This is for the death of the beef and the disposal of the inedible parts. Then they will charge you $1.20 per pound for the hanging weight to hang, cut, wrap and freeze your meat. If you split a beef, you will split the processing costs as well. I warn you, once you buy beef like this, it’s hard to go back! The frozen beef will last way over a year in your freezer. 

Almost ready heifers! Yum!

Almost ready heifers! Yum!

Before I breakdown the ballpark costs for you I want to talk about something important (in case you didn’t read the PDF I linked above). My beef averages around 1200 pounds when it is slaughtered. After it is slaughtered, the blood, organs and head will be removed, leaving about 62% of the original body weight. This is called the “hanging or rail weight”. After that, your carcass will age, losing another 21% of weight. This is the industry standard. Because most people don’t see this process, sometimes they think they are going to get 1200 pounds of meat and are very surprised when they end up with about 600 lbs of packaged, frozen beef. 

So let’s ballpark price and amount for a half of a beef shall we?

Let’s say you want a half of an 1200 pound grain fed beef. That’s $1000 for the beef. Now you want to have it killed. That is half of $125, ($62.5). So far you’re committed for $1062.50. And you have 372 pounds of beef that needs to be cut and wrapped. You pay the $1.20 per pound to do that, adding another $446.40 to the $1062.50, you already accrued. You have a grand total of $1,508.90 invested in 295 pound of premium beef. This gives you an average of about $5.11 per pound for beef where you know how the beef lived, how the beef was treated and how the beef died.

Please check out https://www.beefresearch.org/ for more

Please check out https://www.beefresearch.org/ for more

I know this seems overwhelming. But it’s not once you get going. I strive to make this as fun and educational as possible. I will help you with recipes for unfamiliar cuts you will receive, you can come visit you beef before it’s death, in short, I want you to be as involved as you feel comfortable because I believe that should be a right. 

Please email me at MegRBrown@gmail.com if you have any questions, comments or concerns. Thank you!

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Earth Day, Grazing and Fire Prevention

Over the past two years our ranch has been involved with two fires. In 2017, the Cherokee Fire burned our ranch destroying homes, trees, barns, out buildings, water infrastructure, fences and corrals. It caused almost $4 million in damage to our home ranch. The Camp Fire happened in 2018. Although we were spared from flames damaging our property, the evacuations, water infrastructure damage, smoke damage and stress to ourselves and animals is still causing major problems.

The home ranch still burning the morning after the Cherokee Fire.

The home ranch still burning the morning after the Cherokee Fire.

Living through several natural disasters I’ve become accustom to answering questions about what we do, as cattle people, to mitigate damage from fire. For six generations my family has lived in this area, running cattle with little change. Fire has always been part of our plan, however the past few years it seems like it has been excessively different.

In honor of Earth Day, I’d like to show you one big benefit of grazing cattle; fire fuel load reduction.

The two photos below were taken one year apart. The top photo was our ranch un-grazed spring of 2018. The Cherokee Fire destroyed all of our fences so we were not able to run cattle on this side of the ranch during the winter of 2018 like we normally would. The result was grass that almost grew taller than I. The fuel load was massive and we were so scared we were going to burn up, again.

Spring 2018

Spring 2018

The second photo shows what healthy grazing looks like. The grass is managed and healthy (as are the cattle). The cattle also release nutrients back into the soil with the poo and provide us with food and fiber. Cattle play an important role in fire prevention in our area.

Spring 2019

Spring 2019

As we enter the 2019 fire season, I’d like you remind you, your local neighborhood cattle are working hard to mitigate potential damage around our communities.  They are doing this without using pesticide, electricity, loud mowers or fossil fuel, just a four chambered stomach.  Help support them by having a lovely hamburger or steak for dinner this week?

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