Tag Archives: beef

Beef For Sale

It’s that time of the year again! I’m finishing beef for you!

After much complaining and sulking on my part, my Parents have graciously given me our open heifers to sell as beef to you. These are the sisters of the animals we sell to commercial outlets, your Whole Foods, Costco and Raley’s. These heifers didn’t do their job, to get pregnant, so they now they get go to your freezer camp

Herd-mates of your beef checking out Boo dog

Herd-mates of your beef checking out Boo dog

I like to eat heifers because I think they are just a whisper sweeter. This is just personal opinion though. These full blooded black angus heifers are 24-30 months old and weigh around 1100-1200 pounds. I believe the best meat comes from beef animals this age, breed and gender. 

This has where they are living, better view than your house, huh?

This has where they are living, better view than your house, huh?

These beefs have enjoyed a grass diet, here on the ranches, their whole lives. Recently they have been enjoying their summer on clover and natural grasses in picturesque Indian Valley, California. They have received no antibiotics, added hormones, and our handling set up is based on Dr. Temple Grandin’s methods. 

This year, I am offering both grass finished and grain finished animals. I know the popularity for totally grass-fed beef is growing, especially for people involved with CrossFit. If you want a grain finished beef (this is what my family eats), I plan to use a corn, oats, and barley with molasses mix. I plan on starting the finishing process this week, so if you are interested best let me know sooner than later. The beef should be ready for pick up in September. 

A few of the heifers available for sale.

A few of the heifers available for sale.

Down to business.  I charge you for the actual live animal. You will be the proud owner of a live heifer for a while. When the beef is “finished”, I will make an appointment with a mobile slaughter truck and have the beef killed here on our ranch. I am a big fan of this because the beef will not experience any stress, one second she’s hanging out with her cow friends, doing cow things, the next she’s not. 

You will work with the Locker to order the cuts of beef you want. It’s my favorite part, a Foodies dream! You can choose your cuts, how many per package, ect. Please check out this link, it’s a great reference. The Locker will guide you through the cuts and make this experience educational. 

My beef usually goes for around $2000-$2400 for a whole beef. However, most people don’t have room for a whole beef in their freezer, so I offer ½ and ¼ beefs as well. (The general rule is about 28 pounds of meat per cubic foot of freezer space.)

If you choose a half or quarter, you will split the cost of the whole beef. The prices fluctuates based on how you want your beef finished (grass is slightly more) and how much you get. A whole is slightly cheaper than a quarter because it’s less work for me to sell in bulk. 

You will pay me and the Locker separately. The Locker charges an $125 kill/disposal fee per animal. This is for the death of the beef and the disposal of the inedible parts. Then they will charge you $1.20 per pound for the hanging weight to hang, cut, wrap and freeze your meat. If you split a beef, you will split the processing costs as well. I warn you, once you buy beef like this, it’s hard to go back! The frozen beef will last way over a year in your freezer. 

Almost ready heifers! Yum!

Almost ready heifers! Yum!

Before I breakdown the ballpark costs for you I want to talk about something important (in case you didn’t read the PDF I linked above). My beef averages around 1200 pounds when it is slaughtered. After it is slaughtered, the blood, organs and head will be removed, leaving about 62% of the original body weight. This is called the “hanging or rail weight”. After that, your carcass will age, losing another 21% of weight. This is the industry standard. Because most people don’t see this process, sometimes they think they are going to get 1200 pounds of meat and are very surprised when they end up with about 600 lbs of packaged, frozen beef. 

So let’s ballpark price and amount for a half of a beef shall we?

Let’s say you want a half of an 1200 pound grain fed beef. That’s $1000 for the beef. Now you want to have it killed. That is half of $125, ($62.5). So far you’re committed for $1062.50. And you have 372 pounds of beef that needs to be cut and wrapped. You pay the $1.20 per pound to do that, adding another $446.40 to the $1062.50, you already accrued. You have a grand total of $1,508.90 invested in 295 pound of premium beef. This gives you an average of about $5.11 per pound for beef where you know how the beef lived, how the beef was treated and how the beef died.

Please check out https://www.beefresearch.org/ for more

Please check out https://www.beefresearch.org/ for more

I know this seems overwhelming. But it’s not once you get going. I strive to make this as fun and educational as possible. I will help you with recipes for unfamiliar cuts you will receive, you can come visit you beef before it’s death, in short, I want you to be as involved as you feel comfortable because I believe that should be a right. 

Please email me at MegRBrown@gmail.com if you have any questions, comments or concerns. Thank you!

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Mexican Homestyle Soup

Being from California, we are graced with stellar Mexican food. Over the years I’ve taken advantage of this, and taken cooking classes, and sampled as many Taco Trucks as I could, you know, in the name of science and stuff! Actually I have this deep seated fear that when I move to Tennessee someday, I won’t have access to the same quality of Mexican food. I want to make sure I can re-create all my favorites, just in case. This is one of my favorites, something about potato with meat in a spicy broth just makes me happy. This is perfect for a cold day, it’s deeply comforting with a nice little kick.

Like a hug for your belly.

Like a hug for your belly.

Mexican Homestyle Soup

  • 4 Roma tomatoes
  • 2 serrano chiles, stems removed
  • 1 poblano pepper, stem and seeds removed
  • 1 white onion, sliced
  • Half of a head of garlic, paper left on
  • 1 pound carne asada, cut into bite sized pieces
  • 1 Tablespoon oil
  • 2 large potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 3.5 cups beef broth
  • 1 can black beans, rinsed
  • 2 cups frozen sweet corn
  • 3 bay leaves
  • Cilantro
  • Salt and pepper
  • Cumin
Blistered peppers make me a very happy girl!

Blistered peppers make my taste buds pay attention!

Place the tomatoes, Serrano chiles, poblano pepper, onion and garlic in a 375 degree oven. For about about 20 minutes. Remove the garlic after 15 minutes and turn the other ingredients halfway through cooking time. Let cool. Remove the blistered skin from the poblano and paper from garlic. Add all the roasted ingredients to a food processor and process until smooth.

Meat and potatoes make this cattle rancher happy.

Meat and potatoes make this cattle rancher happy.

Season the beef with salt, pepper and cumin. Preheat the oil in a large pot. Cook the beef until nicely browned. Add the potatoes and cook for 3 more minutes, stirring once. Add the broth and bay leaves. Bring to a boil.
Add the pureed mixture to the boiling beef and potatoes. Simmer for 25 minutes. Add beans, corn, cilantro to taste and cook for another 5-10 minutes. Serve with tortillas, avocado, limes and sour cream.

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Wordless Wednesday: Favorite Heifer 

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Why I Use Antibiotics

Antibiotics are amazing. They can do so much, so quickly! I want to tell you a story about one calf and one shot of antibiotics.

IMG_3953

We found this little calf in the morning. Her mom gave birth to her in water during the night and left her. She was very ill. Very cold, very close to death. In fact, when we first saw her, we thought she was already dead. We loaded her in the back of the polaris and took her to the hospital pen. We dried her off, treated her with antibiotics, electrolytes, fluids, iodine on her naval, and some vitamins. We followed the label on the antibiotics and the advice of our veterinarian to the letter.  A few hours later,  she was able to stand up by herself. She was ready to go back to her mom in about a day.

Before and after, in just a matter of hours.

Before and after, in just a matter of hours.

My point here is, despite what Subway would have you think, antibiotics are not always bad when used in animal agriculture. They actually save a lot of lives and a lot of suffering. By the time this calf hits the market, no residue will be left. So please think about that next time food marketers talk about antibiotic free.

Antibiotics are a hot button issue within agriculture right now. Farmers and ranchers are working very hard to fight antibiotic resistance, because we realize how this can and will impact us. Personally, our ranch uses superior genetics, nutrition and vaccines to prevent illness. But as I showed here, sometimes we still have problems and we need to be able to do the humane thing and treat our animals. It’s the right this to do.

I urge you to talk to other farmers,  ranchers and veterinarians to learn how and why they use antibiotics on their ranches. Coming from agriculture and seeing how we have changed our protocols, I feel like our general public might not know what we have changed and why, in regards to this topic. Fear and half-truths have been used often to promote “antibiotic free” meat marketing agenda.

I even got the opportunity to learn more about antibiotics at the Alltech convention I attended last May. Meat scientist Dr. Yancey wrote a nice recap about it, you can read here.

Is antibiotic resistance a problem? Absolutely. Do we know for certain what is causing it? Kinda. Is agriculture doing something about it? Yes.  It is a complex issue. But,  friends and readers, feel safe about the meat your are eating. Trust that your friendly neighborhood ranchers are aware of this problem and we are working hard to continue to keep our food supply safe and affordable. 

If you have more questions or would like a list of more experts, veterinarians, farmers or ranchers to talk to please leave me a comment below and I will do my best to accommodate you. Thank you.

 

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