Category Archives: meat

Beef For Sale

It’s that time of the year again! I’m finishing beef for you!

After much complaining and sulking on my part, my Parents have graciously given me our open heifers to sell as beef to you. These are the sisters of the animals we sell to commercial outlets, your Whole Foods, Costco and Raley’s. These heifers didn’t do their job, to get pregnant, so they now they get go to your freezer camp

Herd-mates of your beef checking out Boo dog

Herd-mates of your beef checking out Boo dog

I like to eat heifers because I think they are just a whisper sweeter. This is just personal opinion though. These full blooded black angus heifers are 24-30 months old and weigh around 1100-1200 pounds. I believe the best meat comes from beef animals this age, breed and gender. 

This has where they are living, better view than your house, huh?

This has where they are living, better view than your house, huh?

These beefs have enjoyed a grass diet, here on the ranches, their whole lives. Recently they have been enjoying their summer on clover and natural grasses in picturesque Indian Valley, California. They have received no antibiotics, added hormones, and our handling set up is based on Dr. Temple Grandin’s methods. 

This year, I am offering both grass finished and grain finished animals. I know the popularity for totally grass-fed beef is growing, especially for people involved with CrossFit. If you want a grain finished beef (this is what my family eats), I plan to use a corn, oats, and barley with molasses mix. I plan on starting the finishing process this week, so if you are interested best let me know sooner than later. The beef should be ready for pick up in September. 

A few of the heifers available for sale.

A few of the heifers available for sale.

Down to business.  I charge you for the actual live animal. You will be the proud owner of a live heifer for a while. When the beef is “finished”, I will make an appointment with a mobile slaughter truck and have the beef killed here on our ranch. I am a big fan of this because the beef will not experience any stress, one second she’s hanging out with her cow friends, doing cow things, the next she’s not. 

You will work with the Locker to order the cuts of beef you want. It’s my favorite part, a Foodies dream! You can choose your cuts, how many per package, ect. Please check out this link, it’s a great reference. The Locker will guide you through the cuts and make this experience educational. 

My beef usually goes for around $2000-$2400 for a whole beef. However, most people don’t have room for a whole beef in their freezer, so I offer ½ and ¼ beefs as well. (The general rule is about 28 pounds of meat per cubic foot of freezer space.)

If you choose a half or quarter, you will split the cost of the whole beef. The prices fluctuates based on how you want your beef finished (grass is slightly more) and how much you get. A whole is slightly cheaper than a quarter because it’s less work for me to sell in bulk. 

You will pay me and the Locker separately. The Locker charges an $125 kill/disposal fee per animal. This is for the death of the beef and the disposal of the inedible parts. Then they will charge you $1.20 per pound for the hanging weight to hang, cut, wrap and freeze your meat. If you split a beef, you will split the processing costs as well. I warn you, once you buy beef like this, it’s hard to go back! The frozen beef will last way over a year in your freezer. 

Almost ready heifers! Yum!

Almost ready heifers! Yum!

Before I breakdown the ballpark costs for you I want to talk about something important (in case you didn’t read the PDF I linked above). My beef averages around 1200 pounds when it is slaughtered. After it is slaughtered, the blood, organs and head will be removed, leaving about 62% of the original body weight. This is called the “hanging or rail weight”. After that, your carcass will age, losing another 21% of weight. This is the industry standard. Because most people don’t see this process, sometimes they think they are going to get 1200 pounds of meat and are very surprised when they end up with about 600 lbs of packaged, frozen beef. 

So let’s ballpark price and amount for a half of a beef shall we?

Let’s say you want a half of an 1200 pound grain fed beef. That’s $1000 for the beef. Now you want to have it killed. That is half of $125, ($62.5). So far you’re committed for $1062.50. And you have 372 pounds of beef that needs to be cut and wrapped. You pay the $1.20 per pound to do that, adding another $446.40 to the $1062.50, you already accrued. You have a grand total of $1,508.90 invested in 295 pound of premium beef. This gives you an average of about $5.11 per pound for beef where you know how the beef lived, how the beef was treated and how the beef died.

Please check out https://www.beefresearch.org/ for more

Please check out https://www.beefresearch.org/ for more

I know this seems overwhelming. But it’s not once you get going. I strive to make this as fun and educational as possible. I will help you with recipes for unfamiliar cuts you will receive, you can come visit you beef before it’s death, in short, I want you to be as involved as you feel comfortable because I believe that should be a right. 

Please email me at MegRBrown@gmail.com if you have any questions, comments or concerns. Thank you!

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Recipe: Ranch Beans

This recipe is one that has always existed for me. My Mom got the recipe from her ex boyfriend’s Mom before I was born. It was a staple growing up. It was made for every ranch work day. Quite frankly, I take this dish for granted. I didn’t realize just how deeply satisfying and delicious it was until college, when my friends would beg me to take them to my Parent’s with me for lunch. For a while we called these Todd’s beans because my friend Todd talked about them so much when we were in college.

Pure comfort.

Pure comfort.

This recipe is just a suggestion. You can add things, like jalapeños or bay leaves or not. It really depends on your personal preference. My Mom generally doesn’t put peppers in hers,  whereas I go crazy and use chicken stock, bay leaves and jalapeño in mine. It’s important to not salt this dish until the end because the cured pork already has a lot of salt.

Cranberry beans are my favorite bean.

Cranberry beans are my favorite bean.

Ranch Beans

1 ham hock (or meaty ham bone or ham shank if you want a less meaty batch of beans)
1 pound cranberry beans (I think cranberry beans are a must have here, they are a really great bean!)
1 (or 2) minced jalapeños (optional)
1 onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, smashed (optional)
1 or two bay leaves (optional)
Water or chicken stock
Salt and pepper to taste

Soak beans overnight, drain and rinse. Place beans in large stock pot or crockpot; add all ingredients and water or broth to cover. Turn heat to high, watch closely, when it starts to boil, place lid on pot and turn temperature to simmer. Simmer for several hours or until beans are cooked and meat has fallen off the ham hock. Use slotted spoon to remove bones and any undesirable parts from ham hock. Then taste, add salt if needed or more pepper, depends on your tastes.

Cleaning the ham hock is a crappy job, lots of little bones and stuff to get out.

Cleaning the ham hock is a crappy job, lots of little bones and stuff to get out.

This makes incredible leftovers too! It also freezes well. Try with it with Mexican cheese and tortillas, it’ll rock your world!

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Wordless Wednesday: Cochon555

Be there!

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Wordy Wednesday: Beef 2017

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My Hog Scholarship: The First One

It’s true what they say, ‘it takes a village to raise a child”. Growing up, I was surrounded by people who helped me build my knowledge and skill set. However, I did not realize it at the time. When my Grandpa Brown gave me my first bucket calf, I had no idea that would be the start of my ranching legacy. When my Grandpa Halsey would take me out to his garden and spend time with me, I had no idea it would foster a lifelong passion for growing plants. When my Mom chauffeured me to endless 4-H community and project meetings, I had no idea I would end up as the AgHag.

Papa and me spending time in his garden. One of my fondest memories.

Papa and me spending time in his garden. One of my fondest memories.

While I was busy as a child learning from my elders and putting that knowledge to use in 4-H and on the ranch, my Mom was busy investing my 4-H and bucket calf checks in a savings account. By the time I was 18, due to family and friends supporting me, I not only had a good foundation to the education I was going to receive in college, I could pay for it without struggling.
The ability to not worry about finances while attending university was a massive gift. I was able to focus on learning, I was able to join clubs that furthered my education and network, I was able to make friends and have the blissful experience of being a college kid. This molded me into who and what I am now. My world and my point of view was altered for the better and greater good.

This hog helped me pay for college.

This hog helped me pay for college.

When I think about my youth and young adulthood, I realize how lucky and privileged I was to grow up in this world surrounded by the people I did. Sadly, most of the “old timers” have died. But they left a legacy. In me. It’s now my turn to offer that same support to the children in my world. It’s what they showed me to do.
That’s why I am excited to have a couple little “programs” here on the ranch that help me corrupt the next generation, just like I was. I’ve worked hard to expand and improve my hog operation since Adult 4-H days, and I am now at the point where I can afford to give a few piglets away to kids to raise, donate finished pork to local non-profits and generally do Good Things. This makes me about 100 kinds of happy and makes me feel like my hard work is paying off.

Very new Ian meeting his piglet!

Very new Ian meeting his piglet! He was totally helping me out this day!

I have just completed my first round of the “scholarship program” with my hogs and Baby Ian. Ian and this litter of pigs were born on the same day, his Parents have also supported my meat business for years, so it was totally meant to be that Ian was the first of my friend’s kids to do this.
When Ian was born I gave him a piglet to “raise”. The deal was, he’d pay for his pig’s feed and when it was time for the hog to be slaughtered his Parents would “buy” the pig from him to eat. That money is to be put into an account for college or trade school. I figure I’m killing two birds with one stone, I expose kids to agriculture very young and they get a little seed money for their future. It’s a win/win.

Ian enjoying a first taste of his pork. Kid, I'm pretty sure I make that same face.

Ian enjoying a first taste of his pork. Kid, I’m pretty sure I make that same face.

This situation worked out perfectly. Ian got his meat back just as he started solid foods! So he is able to eat his own pork he helped raise. This program was so fun to do I cannot wait for my next litter! As of right now I have scholarship recipients for the next couple of litters. If I have anything to do with it, in about 18 years we are going to have several new ag majors joining our ranks!

This brings me so much joy right here.

This brings me so much joy right here.

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Tuscan Ravioli Salad

Recently my Mom was laid up for a few weeks. It was hard on her because she is incredibly active here on the ranch. There really wasn’t much I could do to help her with Dr. ordered rest, but I could make her comfort food. There was a lot of tomato soup, grilled cheese, broccoli bacon salad and this little gem of a recipe. There are about a million versions of this floating around the internet, this one happens to be our favorite. I think next time I might switch it up a little and add some sweet purple onion. It’s always a crowd pleaser so think about making it for your next pot luck.

Yum.

Yum.

Tuscan Ravioli Salad

1 lb. cheese ravioli
1/4 c. extra-virgin olive oil
3 tbsp. good balsamic vinegar
1 tbsp. honey
Dash of red pepper flakes
salt
ground black pepper
1 cup cooked bacon or pancetta, crumbled
1 cup baby spinach
1/2 cup sun-dried tomatoes, chopped
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan

I like this salad because it has lovely colors. Makes me happy.

I like this salad because it has lovely colors. Makes me happy.

 

Cook ravioli according to package directions. Drain and transfer to large serving bowl.
Meanwhile, mix olive oil, vinegar, honey and season with salt and peppers to taste.
In the large serving bowl add bacon, spinach, sun-dried tomatoes, parmesan and dressing, toss until well combined.

I had to add a picture of bacon. Had to.

I had to add a picture of bacon. Had to.

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Mexican Homestyle Soup

Being from California, we are graced with stellar Mexican food. Over the years I’ve taken advantage of this, and taken cooking classes, and sampled as many Taco Trucks as I could, you know, in the name of science and stuff! Actually I have this deep seated fear that when I move to Tennessee someday, I won’t have access to the same quality of Mexican food. I want to make sure I can re-create all my favorites, just in case. This is one of my favorites, something about potato with meat in a spicy broth just makes me happy. This is perfect for a cold day, it’s deeply comforting with a nice little kick.

Like a hug for your belly.

Like a hug for your belly.

Mexican Homestyle Soup

  • 4 Roma tomatoes
  • 2 serrano chiles, stems removed
  • 1 poblano pepper, stem and seeds removed
  • 1 white onion, sliced
  • Half of a head of garlic, paper left on
  • 1 pound carne asada, cut into bite sized pieces
  • 1 Tablespoon oil
  • 2 large potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 3.5 cups beef broth
  • 1 can black beans, rinsed
  • 2 cups frozen sweet corn
  • 3 bay leaves
  • Cilantro
  • Salt and pepper
  • Cumin
Blistered peppers make me a very happy girl!

Blistered peppers make my taste buds pay attention!

Place the tomatoes, Serrano chiles, poblano pepper, onion and garlic in a 375 degree oven. For about about 20 minutes. Remove the garlic after 15 minutes and turn the other ingredients halfway through cooking time. Let cool. Remove the blistered skin from the poblano and paper from garlic. Add all the roasted ingredients to a food processor and process until smooth.

Meat and potatoes make this cattle rancher happy.

Meat and potatoes make this cattle rancher happy.

Season the beef with salt, pepper and cumin. Preheat the oil in a large pot. Cook the beef until nicely browned. Add the potatoes and cook for 3 more minutes, stirring once. Add the broth and bay leaves. Bring to a boil.
Add the pureed mixture to the boiling beef and potatoes. Simmer for 25 minutes. Add beans, corn, cilantro to taste and cook for another 5-10 minutes. Serve with tortillas, avocado, limes and sour cream.

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Spring Sausage Breakfast Casserole

A major part of growing up on the ranch was food. I guess it is because we work so hard. We need to replace those calories! It was safe to say that whenever we had a big work day or a super busy time, my Mom would fire up her oven and keep everyone full, dumb and happy.

I’m pretty  much the same way. Whenever I know I am going to have a crew of people out here, I start planning a menu. I recently had the crew from FarmHer come out to the ranch for their show. Needless to say, I was 30 kinds of excited.

When I travel, I have a tendency to eat poorly. So a few days in, I crave fruit, fresh veggies, I was anticipating the FarmHer crew might be feeling the same way. So I told them I would have a breakfast ready for them when they came out. I planned on lots of fruit, nuts, this casserole, since I raised the eggs, pork, leek and asparagus and cookies, because cookies.

Fresh squeezed oj, fresh fruit, cookies and casserole is a typical "big work breakfast" here.

Fresh squeezed oj, fresh fruit, cookies and casserole is a typical “big work breakfast” here.

 

Every time I make this casserole, it is met with rave reviews. So I am sharing it in hopes your family will enjoy it too! It’s super easy to toss together the night before and seems like more work than it actually is, perfect for a crowd!

Spring Sausage Breakfast Casserole

  • 1 pound Brown Ranch pork sausage
  • 1 leek, thinly sliced
  • 1 pound asparagus, cut into bite sizes
  • 9 eggs
  • 3 cups milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground mustard
  • 7 slices sourdough bread, cut into bite sizes
  • 1 cup shredded cheese (I prefer a nice melty cheese like an Asadero Or Oaxaca)
  • 1 cup parmesan cheese
Fresh ranch eggs, leftover bread and spring asparagus!

Fresh ranch eggs, leftover bread and spring asparagus!

 

Liberally grease a 9×13 baking dish. Layer the sourdough bread in the dish.

In a large cast iron skillet, crumble and brown your sausage. When the sausage is no longer pink, layer it on top of the bread cubes. Use any leftover grease to caramelize your leek, then layer those on top of the sausage. Do the same thing with the shredded cheese and asparagus.

I love a good melty cheese!

I love a good melty cheese!

Meanwhile, add the eggs, milk, salt, pepper, and mustard in a large bowl and beat until well  mixed.

Add the egg mixture to the baking dish. Top with parmesan cheese. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Caramelized leek in pork fat is amazing.

Caramelized leek in pork fat is amazing.

 

The following morning, remove casserole from the refrigerator 30 minutes before baking.

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Bake i until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean, about 45 minutes.

This actually makes me happy to be awake early in the morning.

This actually makes me happy to be awake early in the morning.

This is great topped with some hot sauce, or even better, California avocado!!! Also you could add jalapenos, regular onion, or a variety of other veggies! This recipe is easily adaptable to your taste.

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Wordless Wednesday: Pigfect

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Wordless Wednesday: Lunch 

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