Category Archives: animals

Piglet Slippers

I did not grow up raising piglets. Of course, I raised hogs in 4-H and FFA as a child, but I only finished hogs. Starting a farrow to finish  business is something I got into in my adult life. I had to learn a lot about farrowing (birthing) piglets, rather quickly. Like anything, to be good, you need to keep learning. I have been incredibly lucky to have lots of pig experts in my life. Again and again I have reached out to them with basic questions and they have come back with thorough, knowledgeable answers.

This is the eponychium on a brand new piglet.

This is the eponychium on a brand new piglet.

In an effort to pay it forward, I decided to share something I find interesting and an average person might not know. The piglet slippers! Let me be clear, piglet slippers is not the correct term, it is the eponychium or the deciduous hoof capsule. Piglets are born with these to prevent hurting the sows reproductive tract. As soon as they are born they dry up and fall off.

The same piglet just a few minutes later. The eponychium is totally gone.

The same piglet just a few minutes later. The eponychium is totally gone.

It’s not just piglets who are born with eponychium, all animals with hooves have them. Unfortunately, I tried this summer to get some good shots of a baby calf’s capsules but the time I wiped the afterbirth off my hands and got my phone out, they were gone. That’s how fast they dry up. I’ll try again next calving season.

And a shot of a piglet in it's sack demonstrating how the eponychium works. This was a healthy, alive piglet by the way.

And a shot of a piglet in it’s sack demonstrating how the eponychium works. This was a healthy, alive piglet by the way.

This is a really fascinating part of birth. Oddly, I can’t remember ever being taught about this in my animal science classes, it was one of those things I had to ask about. I hope I was able to pass on some hog knowledge to you today! 

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Camp Fire: Keep Your Asshole in Your Pants Please

People not from this area, the Camp Fire is huge. And I know you’ve heard ‘forest management’ but I’d like to show you more aspects of our terrain here in Butte County. We have grassland too. Tell me, how do we log this? How do you log a town? ‘Forest management’ isn’t the whole story or answer. The issue is far more complex. I know opinions are like assholes, we all have one. But, gentle reminder, if you aren’t from here and aren’t familiar with our landscape, please keep your asshole in your pants. At least until the smoke is clear, and our community is no longer breathing in our memories and loved ones. I’ve already de-friended too many people lacking empathy and sympathy, don’t make the number higher.

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Camp Fire: Masks Are Important

This is the before and after photo of the masks I’ve been wearing to protect myself from the smoke and ash in the air. The Camp Fire has made the air toxic here. My eyes, skin and throat feel so dirty and heavy. We’re on day 10 of this horrific fire. I’m attempting to share what I can on all my social feeds, it’s helping with the emotions I’m experiencing. I’d like to thank everyone for the support, love, prayers, juju, you’ve sent. We’re Butte Strong and we will get through this.

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Wordless Wednesday: Camp Fire

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Wordless Wednesday: California Cow Chrome

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Luna is Missing

Please help us get our girl home!

Please help us get our girl home!

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Wordless Wednesday: Spring Shipping 2018

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Wordless Wednesday: Cochon555

Be there!

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Wordless Wednesday: A Pile of Pigs

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Guest Post: A Piggy Tale

Living and working on this ranch give me the opportunity to share this lifestyle with others. Sometimes that is as simple as inviting friends to come over for a hike, but sometimes it involves giving my friends animal body parts. My friend amazing Alyssa asked me for some body parts for her kids, now I know this might sound weird or strange at first, but stay with us here. When I figured what she was planning to do, I squealed with delight because this is something I’ve heard a lot about but never seen done. Know what? I’m going to let her tell you what she did….


A Piggy Tale

by Alyssa Manes

When I was young, I loved to read. I picked books based on author (I read all the Black Stallion series by Walter Farley), based on cover (King of the Wind by Marguerite Henry), and based on title (The Secret Garden by F. H. Burnett). There were books I didn’t read for the same reason, and Little House on the Prairie series was one of them. One cover had a girl holding a doll, and that definitely wasn’t a book for me. I’m so glad that having children has given me a chance for a second childhood! We borrowed Little House books on audio CD from our local library to listen to, because our homeschool co-op group was doing a unit on the Little House time period.

Now one of the many advantages of home school is the ability to do some really neat hands-on projects with your kids that might be impractical in a larger group. So when we listened to Little House in the Big Woods, and heard the mention of playing with a pig bladder like a ball….well…..why not try it out? All we needed was a pig bladder and a bit of willingness to try something new.
My friend Megan has a ranch and has started breeding heritage pigs, and was very gracious about hooking us up with several fresh bladders. So here’s how it went down:

 

The pig bladder. Note it is about the size of her hand.

The pig bladder. Note it is about the size of her hand.

I have three children – my son, the oldest, is cautious (which is great because he’ll be driving first), the second has special needs (I think she was napping during our bladder experiment) and the youngest girl is full of joy and mischief.  My plan was for my oldest and youngest to follow instructions and blow up the bladders while I took pictures and helped.  No go.  The youngest was excited to help, but at the age of two, she was a little limited in her ability.  She did hold the pig bladder and watched me closely.  The oldest became the photographer and watched me blow them up.  Now I supposed I could have blown directly into the bladder….after all it didn’t really smell or look all that awful.  But I took the easy route and used a drinking straw.   It actually fit perfectly in the urethra (I’m pinching that part in picture below).  I had a really hard time finding the “tube” that carried urine to the bladder.  I’m not sure if it was a smaller part attached to the urethra or if it was either so small or had some valve to keep the air from flowing out that we never had a leaky bladder once we blew one up.

 

Pinching the urethra of a pig bladder.

Pinching the urethra of a pig bladder.

Considering the bladder started about the size of my hand, it actually expanded quite a bit (see below). When the bladder was full of air, I pinched the urethra as I pulled out the straw, and had my son help me tie a piece of thread around it. I tried once or twice to use the urethra to tie it off like a balloon, but things were too slippery and/or the tube was just too short.
So there you have it!

Blowing the bladder up

Blowing the bladder up

Getting bigger!

Getting bigger!

Once the bladders dried, I suppose you could have played with them. They have a bit of a crinkly sound now, but they have lasted a year and a half looking like this:

Dried bladders.

Dried bladders.

The fat on them is a little greasy, but the main bladder part is translucent and oddly beautiful.

Bladder balloon!

Bladder balloon!

If I had to rate this “activity” as a family experience, here is what I would say:
Pros:

  • not very stinky/smelly (although my dog thinks differently and is hoping that a dried bladder will come within her reach)
  • fascinating to see the bladder inflate and to think of its usefulness in historical terms as a child’s “toy”
  • didn’t take very long
  • medium gross-factor

Cons:

  • tying the string while holding the bladder was a little challenging, since my oldest didn’t want to get too close to the bladder
    wrangling a toddler with gross hands (but this part is still totally worth it in my book….as long as she doesn’t try touching my face…)

Overall, a really cool and memorable experience. Thanks, Megan, for the opportunity to do something so unique!

 


Thanks for sharing this project with us Alyssa! As an avid reader of the Little House books myself, this was so fun to read about!

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